Basic MLA Citation Guidelines

Creating In-Text Citations

Citing Paraphrases

Scenario 1- You read information from an article, book, or website about a type of pollution. Then, you wrote your paragraph about that type. You already knew some information, so you just put what you learned from what you read in your own words and added to what you knew.

In-Text Citation- At the end of the paragraph, put the author's last name of what you read in parenthesis. If there's no name for the author, put the article title in parenthesis.

Scenario 2- You wrote your paragraph based on what you knew, but you used something very specific from an article, book, or website you read. You reworded it, but it was really only a sentence or two in your paragraph

In-Text Citation- At the end of the sentences you paraphrased, put the author's last name of what you read in parenthesis. If there's no name for the author, put the article title in parenthesis.

 

Citing Quotations

Scenario- You used the exact words from an article, book, or website with what you wrote yourself.

Punctuate- Put quotation marks around the part that came from some other source.

In-Text Citation- At the end of the sentences the quote is in, put the author's last name of what you read in parenthesis and a page number if it came from a book. If there's no name for the author, put the article title in parenthesis.

 

Creating a Works Cited Page

Steps

  1. Make a new page at the end of your essay.

  2. Center the words Works Cited in the middle of the page.

  3. Go back to the left margin.

  4. Create a list in MLA format of all the sources you used in your paper. If you read eight articles, but only used 4 in the paper, only cite the 4 you used. 

  5. Make sure the list is in alphabetical order by the first word that appears in the entry. 

  6. Double space the list.

  7. Indent every line of each entry after the first line.

 

Creating MLA Source Entries for Your Works Cited

 

Basic format for books:

Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. City of Publication, Publisher,                 Publication Date.

 

Gleick, James. Chaos: Making a New Science. New York, Penguin, 1987.

 

Basic format for webpages:

Last Name, First Name. “Title of webpage.” Title of whole site, URL of site. Accesssed day Month year.

 

Lundman,Susan. “How to Make Vegetarian Chili.” eHowwww.ehow.            com/how_10727_make-vegetarian-chili.html. Accessed 6 July 2015.

 

There are a lot of other types of sources, so use the tools on this page for further assistance or ask the librarian for help. 

If you use a database, use the source entry the database provides for you.

If you use Citation Machine, check that all needed information is included in your entry.